facebook
twitter
rss
account
search
search
 

Net ads becoming more personal

July 31, 2009 at 10:13 AM   |   Comments

NEW YORK, July 31 (UPI) -- Improved technology extracting information stored on computers means Internet advertising is better directed to individual U.S. consumers, observers say.

The information yielded from "cookies," a tiny piece of code placed on a computer's hard drive, has changed the way online advertising reaches consumers by making it more personal and targeted, The New York Times reported Friday.

"Now, you're traveling the Internet with a cookie that indicates you're this type of consumer: age group X, income level, urban versus rural, presence of children in the household," said Trey Barrett, a product leader at Acxiom, a company that offers this link to marketers.

Advertisers and marketers say such specificity is useful because it removes the guesswork from advertising and showcases products to people deemed most likely interested in the advertised item or service.

Consumer advocates, however, say such specificity is troubling, the Times reported.

"The industry's love affair with persistent cookies has made it virtually impossible for users to go online without being tracked and profiled," Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, told the newspaper.

© 2009 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
Most Popular
1
Syrian Al Qaida group executes Lebanese soldier Syrian Al Qaida group executes Lebanese soldier
2
Kentucky firefighter injured in ice bucket challenge dies Kentucky firefighter injured in ice bucket challenge dies
3
White House intruder had a knife White House intruder had a knife
4
Sister shoots and kills brother to protect father Sister shoots and kills brother to protect father
5
New York buses will feature anti-Islam ads depicting James Foley New York buses will feature anti-Islam ads depicting James Foley
Trending News
Video
x
Feedback