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Pudu deer, just one pound, born in New York

By GABRIELLE LEVY, UPI.com   |   July 9, 2013 at 10:54 AM   |   Comments

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July 9 (UPI) -- Even full-grown, the Southern pudu deer is practically pint-sized, but a brand new baby doe, born May 3, has given the Queens Zoo a double-dose of adorable.

The as-yet unnamed baby deer weighed in at just one pound when she came into the world, born to mama deer Josephine and father, Hamilton.

Even fully grown, she'll weigh just 20 pounds, and measure 12 to 14 inches tall at the shoulder.

She’s adjusting really well,” said Barbara Russo, a spokeswoman for the Wildlife Conservation Society, which runs the zoo, located at Flushing Meadows Corona Park. “She’s very cute and still nursing. She will eventually transition to solid foods.”

Those solid foods will eventually include carrots, hay, fresh leaves, grain, and -- because it's New York -- kale.

Pudu are native to Chile and Argentina, and are considered endangered.

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Ten newborn baby animals
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A baby pudu deer was born May 3 at the Queens Zoo in New York. (Wildlife Conservation Society/Julie Larsen Maher)The Saint Louis Zoo has announced that a black rhinoceros calf was born to first-time parents, mother Kati Rain and father Ajabu in St. Louis on January 14, 2011. Weighing 120-1/2 pounds, the little male is nursing well and being cared for by his mother, according to Zoo staff. This is the first black rhino calf to be born at the Saint Louis Zoo in 20 years. In all, eight black rhino calves have been born at the Zoo. The black rhino has experienced the most drastic decline of any rhino species. In 1970, it was thought there were about 65,000 black rhinos in Africa. By 1993, there were only 2,300 survivors in the wild. Black rhinos are heavily poached, because it is thought in many Asian countries that the rhino horn has medicinal uses. UPI/Saint Louis Zoo
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