facebook
twitter
rss
account
search
search
 

Proteins offer clue to longevity in rats

May 7, 2012 at 8:24 PM   |   Comments

SAN ANTONIO, May 7 (UPI) -- U.S. researchers say they have found a clue as to why the naked mole-rat lives many years longer than any other mouse or rat -- and it's all about proteins.

Scientists at the University of Texas Health Science Center report the naked mole-rat's cellular machines for protein disposal -- called proteasome assemblies -- differ in composition from those of other, shorter-lived rodents, giving the naked mole-rat a superior ability to remove damaged proteins and maintain protein integrity.

Researchers said the strange, hairless rodents maintain exceptional levels of that integrity throughout their long and healthy life.

"More effective removal of damaged proteins within the cell would enable the animal to be able to maintain good function and is likely to contribute to its excellent maintenance of good health well into its third decade of life," researcher Rochelle Buffenstein said.

The study, conducted at the university's Barshop Institute of Longevity and Aging Studies, has been published in the journal PLoS ONE.

© 2012 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
Most Popular
1
NASA locates resting place of late LADEE probe NASA locates resting place of late LADEE probe
2
New frog species found in New York City New frog species found in New York City
3
The politics of disgust: Reactions of shock predict voting habits The politics of disgust: Reactions of shock predict voting habits
4
SpaceX may soon start landing rockets on a platform after they've left Earth SpaceX may soon start landing rockets on a platform after they've left Earth
5
Crash-test dummies gain weight to save lives Crash-test dummies gain weight to save lives
Trending News
Around the Web
x
Feedback