facebook
twitter
rss
account
search
search
 

Fish thought extinct caught in Tennessee

Feb. 9, 2012 at 4:53 PM   |   Comments

NASHVILLE, Feb. 9 (UPI) -- A Tennessee fisherman says he was stunned when a blue walleye, declared extinct in the Great Lakes where it once thrived, was caught in a local lake.

Overfishing through the 1950s wiped out the blue walleye species in its Great Lakes habitat and the last blue walleye caught in Lake Erie by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources was in 1965.

That's why fishing guide David Clark, who offers tours on Tennessee's Dale Hollow Lake, was surprised to see a blue walleye hauled into his boat on a recent fishing expedition.

A lot of olive and gold colored walleye are caught in the lake, he said, but against all odds a customer hooked a 5½-pound blue walleye on a cold day in January.

"It's the only one I've ever seen in Dale Hollow, and nobody's heard of them much down here," Clark told The (Nashville) Tennessean. "But that doesn't mean that they can't come up in the gene pool."

The Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency periodically stocks the lake with gold walleye from Lake Erie, but a blue variety is a surprise, he said.

"It's almost like a redhead baby coming from two brunette parents," Clark said. "It's not as much of a pigment thing as a recessive gene."

The blue was the third of five walleye caught by the group and was hooked in the same spot as the first two, he said.

© 2012 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
Recommended UPI Stories
Featured UPI Collection
trending
2014: The Year in Music [PHOTOS]

2014: The Year in Music [PHOTOS]

Most Popular
1
Mars rover spots rock shaped like thigh bone
2
Tech industry All Stars developing 'Star Trek'-style communication badges
3
Latvia boasts world's first net for migrating bats
4
Parched land in the drought-riddled West is actually rising
5
Neanderthals and humans interacted for thousands of years
Trending News
Video
x
Feedback