facebook
twitter
search
search

Study: Pollination down with bee decline

Sept. 7, 2010 at 4:17 PM

TORONTO, Sept. 7 (UPI) -- A decline in the world's bee population has been accompanied by a drop in pollination critical to the world's food supplies, a Canadian researcher says.

A University of Toronto scientist has found the first evidence of a downward trend in pollination and a possible link to climate change as a cause, a university release says.

James Thomson, a scientist with U of T's Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, has spent 17 years examining the wild lily in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado and has found a decline in pollination, especially early in the growing season.

"Bee numbers may have declined at our research site, but we suspect that a climate-driven mismatch between the times when flowers open and when bees emerge from hibernation is a more important factor," Thomson says.

"This is sobering because it suggests that pollination is vulnerable even in a relatively pristine environment that is free of pesticides and human disturbance but still subject to climate change," he said.

Thomson's research, one of the longest-term studies of pollination ever done, has been published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society.

Related UPI Stories
Latest Headlines
Trending Stories
Some scientists want race removed from genetics research
Expedition finds lost lion population in Ethiopia
Scientists identify butterfly-like insect from the Jurassic age
Taser's effect on cognition may undermine police questioning
Study: Neanderthals' extinction blamed on lost culture war