facebook
twitter
rss
account
search
search
 

Gates: $258 million for malaria research

Oct. 31, 2005 at 12:22 PM   |   Comments

SEATTLE, Oct. 31 (UPI) -- The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has given $258 million in malaria research grants.

The foundation says malaria kills an estimated 2,000 African children each day and takes the lives of more than 1 million people worldwide annually.

"For far too long, malaria has been a forgotten epidemic," said Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates, co-founder of the Gates Foundation. He called it "a disgrace that the world has allowed malaria deaths to double in the last 20 years."

The Seattle-based foundation -- the world's largest philanthropic foundation -- will soon spend more money than the U.S. government for malaria research.

The largest grant, for $107.6 million, was awarded the Seattle-based PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative to work with GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals to complete testing and licensing of the most advanced malaria-vaccine candidate. A trial last year in Mozambique found the vaccine reduced severe malaria by 58 percent in children ages 1 to 4.

The Gates Foundation also awarded $100 million to the Geneva-based Medicines for Malaria Venture to develop new treatments; and $50.7 million to the Innovative Vector Control Consortium to develop improved insecticides and other mosquito-control methods.

© 2005 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
Most Popular
1
NASA satellite shows scope of Aral Sea disaster NASA satellite shows scope of Aral Sea disaster
2
600-year-old canoe discovered in New Zealand 600-year-old canoe discovered in New Zealand
3
Apple releases fix for 'Shellshock' virus Apple releases fix for 'Shellshock' virus
4
Social network Ello getting thousands of requests per hour Social network Ello getting thousands of requests per hour
5
Antarctic ice loss responsible for measurable shift in gravity Antarctic ice loss responsible for measurable shift in gravity
Trending News
x
Feedback