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Doctors remove a 47-pound tumor from Arizona woman's abdomen

The tumor was found in 2012 and Marcey DiCaro was finally able to acquire insurance coverage that would cover her preexisting condition through the Affordable Care Act.
By Evan Bleier Follow @itishowitis Contact the Author   |   June 12, 2014 at 1:48 PM
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TUSCON, Ariz., June 12 (UPI) -- An Arizona woman is recovering at home after a 47.5-pound tumor was removed from her abdomen.

University of Arizona Medical Center doctors performed life-saving surgery on Marcey DiCaro. She was able to afford the operation because of her recently acquired Obamacare insurance.

The medical center put out a release detailing DiCaro's story:

"DiCaro, who had no health insurance at the time of diagnosis, had a scan that revealed a large tumor in March 2012...Finally, in 2014, DiCaro was able to acquire insurance coverage that would cover preexisting conditions through the Affordable Care Act. She underwent surgery April 17. By then, surgery had become more complicated with the growth of the tumor and the involvement of other organs."

The complex operation took about 10 hours to perform and DiCaro suffered cardiac arrest during the surgery.

"Because the tumor had been pressing on the vena cava, it created a blood clot in the vein," UA Department of Surgery interim chief Tun Jie told WSAZ. "The surgery was quite challenging. This was a situation that was not easy to tackle and not all surgeons would have gone forward with it."

One of DiCaro's kidneys had to be removed because it was encased by the tumor.

"After we dissected the tumor off the inferior vena cava, it looked like Swiss cheese," said general surgery chief resident Dr. Angela Echeverria. "There were so many holes in it due to tumor invasion. We took that segment out and reconstructed a new inferior vena cava."

Although DiCaro's tumor was larger, a Georgia woman just had to deal with an exceptionally large 27-pound tumor of her own.

"If the tumor had been let go, it would have killed me," DiCaro said.

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