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Cornell study finds children who eat chicken on the bone are more aggressive

To reduce aggression levels, researchers recommend parents cut chicken into pieces.
By Evan Bleier Follow @itishowitis Contact the Author   |   April 30, 2014 at 1:09 PM
| License Photo

ITHACA, N.Y., April 30 (UPI) -- Researchers at Cornell University conducted a study about biting versus chewing habits in children and found that kids who eat chicken on the bone are more likely to disobey adults and be aggressive.

The study, which was published in Eating Behaviors, found that children were “twice as likely to disobey adults and twice as aggressive toward other kids” when eating food they had to hold and bite.

Researches found that children were more docile when eating cut-up pieces of food, results which would seem to indicate that there is a connection between having to use teeth to eat and aggressive behavior.

Not everyone agrees with the study’s findings.

“I think people have been eating chicken wings, chicken drumsticks for a millennia and I don’t think it’s made them any more aggressive than they otherwise would have been,” clinical psychologist Dr. Brian Russell told Fox News.

The children that the researchers studied were between the ages of 6 and 10.

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