account
search
search

UPI NewsTrack Quirks in the News

  |   March 19, 2013 at 5:02 PM
Mom, 8-year-old son are crime fighters

CLEVELAND, March 19 (UPI) -- A Cleveland woman and her 8-year-old son took on a home invasion and won, by dunking the intruder's head in a fish tank, among other actions.

Jamila Sloan said the suspect entered her home Saturday and "busted through my kitchen door."

"This is my house," she later told WOIO-TV. "I was really in fear of my life, my son's life."

Police said she and son Chris Turner pushed the intruder into the fish tank, and hitting him on the head.

"I was choking him and punching him and biting and scratching and doing everything I could," she said.

When the suspect pulled his mom's hair, the son "got really, really mad," Chris said. "I got mad and starting hitting him with a handle from my scooter."

Cleveland police arrested Talbert Glenn at the scene, adding Glenn has a criminal record for drug and weapons possession. .


Police: Man scratched hundreds of cars

EMMEN, Netherlands, March 19 (UPI) -- Police in Netherlands said they arrested a man who admitted to scratching paint on hundreds of cars to work out his frustration from personal problems.

Emmen police said the 59-year-old man, whose name was not released, admitted Monday to causing more than $1.3 million in damage to hundreds of cars during the past year to work out his "frustration" from personal problems, DutchNews.nl reported Tuesday.

The national ANP news agency said the man was caught Saturday night allegedly scratching cars with a screwdriver.

Police said the man was angry no reward had been offered for information leading to his capture, so he carved "1000BTW" into one of the cars, standing for "1,000 euros ($1,288) too little reward.


British company markets $175,000 bed

LONDON, March 19 (UPI) -- A British mattress company is billing its $175,000 "Royal Bed" as "an investment" in a good night's sleep.

Alistair Hughes, managing director of Savoir Beds, which began selling the pricey beds this week at Kensington Palace in London, said the bed is worth the high price for a "great night's sleep," CNBC reported Tuesday.

"It's an investment that pays off every morning of your life," Hughes said.

The company said each mattress involves more than 700 hours of labor, with "masses and masses" of curled Latin American horse tail, "mountains" of Mongolian cashmere and nearly 1,600 miles worth of specially woven silk.

The company said it has teamed with the Royal School of Needlework, which was partially responsible for the wedding dress worn by Kate, wife of Prince William, to have each mattress personalized with a family crest, initials or a favorite emblem.

"Ultimately what luxury is about, it's exclusive, very much for you," Hughes said.

He said only about 60 of the beds will be made and each one will take about 16 weeks from order to delivery.


Swedes had more than 2,000 rare bird eggs

HARNOSAND, Sweden, March 19 (UPI) -- Swedish police said three men are accused of violating protected species laws had more than 2,000 rare bird eggs hidden in a trap door in a house.

Police said the investigation, which is connected to investigations in Finland and Britain, resulted in a raid on the Harnosand house, where the rare eggs were hidden beneath a trap door, The Local.se reported Tuesday.

Investigator Stig Anddersson said the men are believed to be connected to a Finnish man arrested in June with 10,000 rare eggs and a British suspect who allegedly sent a warning email to one of the Swedish suspects after his arrest.

"There are different forums on the Internet that connect these people," Anddersson said.

The men are accused of taking the eggs -- which include owls, eagles, chickadees, nightingales, cranes and plovers -- from across the country. They are accused of aggravated hunting crimes and breaching protected species laws.

The men could each face up to a year in prison if convicted.

Police said egg thieves are known to build collections and trade with other collectors.

© 2013 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
x
Feedback