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  |   March 15, 2013 at 6:30 AM
Pot hidden in shipment of bell peppers

NOGALES, Ariz., March 14 (UPI) -- U.S. Customs and Border Protection said authorities arrested a 35-year-old Mexican man accused of hiding more than a ton of marijuana among bell peppers.

Customs officials said the man's tractor trailer was pulled over for inspection Tuesday at the Nogales Commercial Facility after crossing the border into Arizona when a drug-sniffing dog detected the presence of contraband, KVOA-TV, Tucson, Ariz., reported Thursday.

Investigators discovered 280 packages of marijuana, together weighing more than a ton, worth an estimated $1,068,000, KPHO-TV, Phoenix, reported. The drugs were hidden inside a shipment of bell peppers.

The drugs and truck were seized and the suspect, whose name was not released, was turned over to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Homeland Security Investigations agents.


Counterfeit bills inside returned printer

LAKE HALLIE, Wis., March 14 (UPI) -- Police in Wisconsin said they busted a counterfeiting suspect who allegedly returned a printer to Walmart with fake bills inside.

Lake Hallie Police Chief Cal Smokowicz said officers were called to Walmart March 7 by employees who said Jarad Carr, 37, had attempted to return a printer without a receipt or other proof of purchase and workers found a sheet of counterfeit bills inside the device, The Chippewa Herald, Chippewa Falls, Wis., reported.

Officers said employees refused to accept the printer, but Carr insisted and would not leave.

Smokowicz said Carr refused to speak to officers and resisted arrest.

Carr, who was found to be carrying three additional counterfeit $100 bills, was arrested on charges of attempted theft by fraud, forgery and resisting arrest.


Pi Day celebrates irrational number

NEW YORK, March 14 (UPI) -- Events were being held Thursday in New York and across the country to celebrate "Pi Day," the date resembling the irrational number pi.

March 14, celebrated as Pi Day as the first three digits of the number are 3.14, was being marked in New York with a pi-themed scavenger hunt at the Museum of Mathematics, the New York Daily News reported Thursday.

Matthew Plummer, a former math teacher at Boston's Hanover High School, was inviting people to take the "Pie Day Challenge" with math puzzles on his website, pidaychallenge.com.

Meanwhile, the number, which is used to calculate the circumference of a circle, is the subject of a Pi Day Pie Baking Contest hosted by website Serious Eats, which is taking submissions of recipes and pictures of the finished product.

Students at the California Institute of Technology kicked off Pi Day at 1:59 a.m. Thursday with 160 pies -- 26 each of five kinds -- to mark pi to nine digits, 3.14159265, the Los Angeles Times reported Thursday.

"It's a celebration of nerdiness," said Christopher Perez, president of Caltech's math club. "Pi literally shows up everywhere -- in science, in math and nature. A circle is such a fundamental concept."


Alarm clock app difficult to turn off

CONTROGUERRA, Italy, March 14 (UPI) -- A pair of Italian developers have created an alarm clock smartphone app designed to help users wake up with math games and other tasks.

The FreakyAlarm app, created by Enrico Angelini and Gabriele Di Lorenzo, has a basic mode where users must take pictures of objects or barcodes before bed then photograph the same objects or barcodes to shut the alarm off in the morning, the New York Daily News reported Thursday.

The app also has an "evil" setting, which requires users to solve difficult math equations to shut off the alarm.

Other settings include a game requiring users to pop the "alarm bubbles" in a precise order, a "Memory" type game and a game requiring users to tap certain shapes a specific number of times.

The app can be purchased for $1.99 in the iTunes store.

Topics: Marijuana
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