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Jockstrip: The world as we know it.

  |   March 11, 2013 at 6:00 AM
Skipped shot costs student $50,000

ST. LOUIS, March 11 (UPI) -- A University of Missouri-St. Louis student missed out on a $50,000 contest prize Sunday by not making a 3-pointer before sinking his half-court shot.

Alex Permann had 24 seconds to make a layup, a free throw, a 3-pointer and a bomb from mid-court during the contest before the Missouri Valley Conference Tournament championship. The 23-year-old South Dakota native made the first two shots but instead of trying a 3-pointer, he raced to center court and heaved the ball into the hoop with 2 seconds to spare.

The crowd of 16,659 at Scottrade Center went wild and Permann started to celebrate, only to be told the $50,000 wasn't his because he skipped a shot.

"Little bitter about that," a clearly disappointed Permann told Fox Sports Kansas City. "But oh well. Hopefully we can get enough press and pressure them into hopefully [handing over the money]."

That apparently wasn't going to happen as Missouri Valley Conference officials showed Fox Sports Kansas City an affidavit, signed by Permann acknowledging he had to make all four shots to claim the prize.

Permann didn't go away empty-handed, though. Conference officials presented him with a lifetime all-session pass to the MVC Tournament and a contest sponsor provided a year's supply of pizza and doughnuts.

All in all, Permann said, "It was an awesome experience."


Google shoe does it all

AUSTIN, Texas, March 10 (UPI) -- U.S. Internet giant Google has got it all over Maxwell Smart, the 1960s TV secret agent who had a phone in his shoe -- its sneaker has a computer.

Google's high-tech footwear isn't ready for mass production yet, but its marketing folks showed up at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas, with a few pairs just to get people thinking, ABC News reported Sunday. Other bells and whistles jammed into the sneakers include an accelerometer, a pressure sensor, a gyroscope , Bluetooth and a speaker so it can talk to you.

"The Talking Shoe is an experiment in how you can use connected objects to tell stories on the Web today," Aman Govil, who heads up the Google advertising arts team, told ABC.

Just what might this mean in the future? Well, a couch potato who sits around too long might get yelled at to get moving. Or a marathon runner could have speeds posted to social media in real time.

And don't think your sneaker's voice would necessarily be the placid and calming one routinely heard on GPS software.

"If you put what the shoe knows through an algorithmic logic engine, it can translate it into copy," Govil said. "Now if you give that copy to an interesting copy writer, you could give the shoe personality. One shoe could be the trash-talking shoe."


Angola woman gives birth at 38,000 feet

NEW YORK, March 10 (UPI) -- A young Angola woman gave birth during a flight from South Africa to New York, a witness to the event says.

Fatawmatt Kaba, 17, went into labor at 38,000 feet aboard South African Airways Flight 203 about four hours into the 16-hour flight Saturday and delivered a son with the help of three passengers -- two doctors and a nurse, Jamahl Winter told the New York Daily News.

"You could see his little umbilical cord still attached," Winters, 32, said. "It's amazing. I didn't think stuff like that really happened in real life. I thought it was something that happened in TV and movies."

Dr. Julie Williamson, a 41-year-old California pediatric anesthesiologist, described the midair delivery as "exhilarating."

"While there was a lot of discussion whether to divert the flight, she made the decision for us by saying, 'Push!' And when we checked, the baby was crowning, and she delivered him in two pushes," Williamson told the Daily News.

"He nursed right away. And she was a very strong woman -- never cried, never complained. It was amazing."

Kaba and her newborn son, named Mamel Joell, were resting comfortably later at Jamaica Medical Center in New York.

"I'm very happy," Kaba told the newspaper. "I'm fine. He's fine."

Under U.S. law, Mamel is not an American citizen because he was born outside U.S. airspace, the Daily News said.


Tattoo gets man free year of Netflix

LOS GATOS, Calif., March 10 (UPI) -- An Indiana man got a Netflix tattoo on his torso and after posting it to Twitter, company representatives saw it and gave him a free year's subscription.

Myron Robinson of Kokomo said he's always been a big fan of the company and as an inside joke with a few friends, got the tattoo. He tweeted a picture, saying, "@netflix put me on a commercial I love you guys."

KGO-TV, San Francisco, said Netflix responded, retweeting "NO WAY! Free year for you."

A year's subscription to Netflix costs about $96, the San Francisco Chronicle said.

Reed Hastings, chief executive officer for the Los Gatos, Calif., company, also posted Robinson's story on his Facebook page.

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