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Jockstrip: The world as we know it.

  |   March 7, 2013 at 6:00 AM
Man gets summons for laughing too loudly

ROCKVILLE CENTRE, N.Y., March 6 (UPI) -- A Rockville Centre, N.Y., man was arraigned for allegedly disturbing the peace, in his case, laughing too loudly in his own home.

Robert Schiavelli, 42, was given two summonses because his next-door neighbor complained he could hear his hearty laughter across the driveway, the New York Post reported Wednesday.

Schiavelli, regarded as disabled because of frequent seizures and neurological impairments, said his neighbor, Daniel O'Hanian, often taunts him due to his disability, and laughs off the derision.

"It's absurd. My client faces 30 days in jail for laughing," Andrew Campanelli, Schiavelli's attorney, said in court.

Schiavelli's next court date had not been set, the newspaper said.


Error leads to $8,500 water bill

EUGENE, Ore., March 6 (UPI) -- Officials with an Oregon water utility said a man received an $8,500 bill due to a transcription error when tabulating his water use.

Ivan Polk said he moved out of his Eugene rental house recently and was shocked when his final bill from the Eugene Water and Electric Board amounted to $8,500, which he said was "a million gallons of water," KVAL-TV, Eugene, reported Wednesday.

The board's Joe Harwood said the bill was the result of a clerical mistake.

"What happened was essentially a transcription error that added up to an added extra digit to Mr. Polk's water use and hence when he opened his bill he had severe sticker shock," Harwood said. "We usually catch those, but in this case, which is fairly rare, we actually had one that slipped through."

Polk said he was pleased to find the $8,500 bill was sharply reduced to $150 once the mistake was corrected.


PetSmart manager returns $30K diamond

VERO BEACH, Fla., March 6 (UPI) -- The manager of a Florida PetSmart said he returned a $30,000 diamond to its rightful owner because "it's how I was raised."

Katie Sattler said he panicked when she noticed the $30,000 diamond from the engagement ring given to her by her husband, Mark, was missing after she took her pet to the groomer at the PetSmart in Vero Beach, WPBF-TV, West Palm Beach, Fla., reported Wednesday.

Sattler's first call was to her husband.

"She's just frantically crying," Mark Sattler said. "I knew something was seriously wrong. She's just hyperventilating and I'm just trying to figure out what's going on."

Katie Sattler then tried calling the PetSmart and spoke to manager Jeff Lamscha.

"I couldn't understand her at first," Lamscha said. "There was stuttering, sounded like crying. I wasn't sure what was going on."

Lamscha said he was eventually able to understand Sattler's problem and walked back to the grooming area, where he soon discovered the $30,000 diamond.

The manager said it never occurred to him to keep the diamond and he told Sattler she could pick it up at her convenience.

"I just feel like that's something everybody should do. It's how I was raised," he said.

The Sattlers said they are grateful to Lamscha.

"It's just a happy ending story where someone had the honor, the integrity, the sincerity to step up to the plate and do the right thing," Mark Stattler said.


$7,000 lost & found at Atlanta airport

ATLANTA, March 6 (UPI) -- Police in Georgia said $7,000 cash turned in by an honest airport employee has been returned to its rightful owner.

Pamela North Hollowaay, a part-time employee at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, said she discovered the envelope filled with 70 $100 bills by the curb outside a park-and-ride area at the international terminal, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported Wednesday.

"I showed the money to the [shuttle] driver then I went right inside and turned it in right away," North Hollowaay said. "I could've kept the money but I didn't do that. I'm an honest citizen. I'm a taxpayer and I believe in doing the right thing."

The money was turned over to the Atlanta Police Department, which said it was reported missing by an Alabama podiatrist on his way to Costa Rica.

North Hollowaay said she was happy to hear the money made it back into its owner's hands.

"Hopefully if that ever happened to me, someone would turn my money back in too," she said.

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