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Jockstrip: The world as we know it.

Feb. 28, 2013 at 6:00 AM   |   Comments

Chinese exec apologizes for airport rage

KUNMING, China, Feb. 27 (UPI) -- A Chinese mining executive and government official has apologized for going berserk at an airport after he and his family missed a flight.

Yan Linkun's actions on Feb. 19 were captured by security cameras at the Kungming Changshui Airport, ABC News reported.

The videotape shows him picking up a metal stand and trying to smash the glass doors leading to the boarding area. When he was unable to break the glass, he smashed the counter at the gate.

Three security guards watched without taking action. Another passenger finally intervened and persuaded Yan to calm down.

Yan is a member of a government advisory board in Yunnan province and told Shanghai Daily he had not behaved well.

"I failed to be a qualified political adviser, as well as a good father," Yan said.

He also apologized to the airport and offered to pay for any damage.

Police are investigating but Yan had not been charged with anything as of Wednesday morning. Yan was suspended from his job.


Gold coin auction brings $3.5 million

CARSON CITY, Nev., Feb. 27 (UPI) -- Recluse Walter Samaszko Jr.'s gold coins, found after his death, brought in more than $3.5 million in a Carson City, Nev., auction.

About half the collection, found neatly organized and labeled after the death of Samaszko, 69, in June, was offered in the Tuesday auction, the Carson City Appeal said Wednesday, noting his wealth was never suspected until a crew sent to clean out his home discovered the trove of coins.

A total of 9,644 coins were auctioned at the Carson Courthouse, the majority of the lots obtained by Carson City coin dealer Allen Rowe.

Howard Herz said he has appraised other collections after an owner's death, but never one this large.

"It's a very well-managed investment in gold," he said.

The rest of the coins will be auctioned or sold at a later date, the newspaper said.


World's oldest woman confirmed in Japan

OSAKA, Japan, Feb. 27 (UPI) -- A Japanese woman who turns 115 next week is now the oldest person of her gender alive, the Guinness Book of World Records said Wednesday.

Misao Okawa was born March 5, 1898, in Osaka. She became the world's oldest woman on Jan. 12, when Koto Okubo, also Japanese, died at the age of 115 and 19 days.

The world's oldest man, Jiroemon Kimura, is 115 years and 314 days old. Kimura, of Japan, is both the oldest person alive now and the oldest man who has ever lived whose age is confirmed, Guinness said.

Jeanne Calment of France, who had the longest life on record, died in 1997 at the age of 122 and 164 days.

Okawa married in 1919. She lived in Kobe, where her husband had a business, returning to Osaka after his death. She had three children, with one daughter and her son still living at the age of 90-plus, four grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.

Japan has 51,376 centenarians, 44,842 of them female. The average lifespan of Japanese women is 85.9 years.

"It is an honour to welcome Misao-san into the Guinness World Records family," said Craig Glenday, Guinness's editor in chief. "Her impressive longevity -- nearly 42,000 days -- is an inspiration and a testament to the Japanese lifestyle."


Lincoln statue destined for Gettysburg

GETTYSBURG, Pa., Feb. 27 (UPI) -- The artist who created a statue of Abraham Lincoln to be erected in Gettysburg, Pa., said he will return annually for the statue's maintenance.

Salt Lake City artist Stanley Watts, who since 2008 has sought a Gettysburg site able to accept the extreme weight of the 7-foot-6-inch-tall statue, will also provide the crane for the statue's installation in April at the library in downtown Gettysburg, the Hanover Evening Sun reported Tuesday.

"It will be a very attractive gift to the borough and should be a compelling driver for tourists to visit downtown," said Rob Lesher, the executive director of the Adams County Library System.

After years of unsuccessful attempts to install the statue at the library and other sites, such as the American Civil War Museum, the Lincoln Train Station, Gettysburg Presbyterian Church, the library now owns the statue, the Evening Star reported.

"It's a very sizable monument," said Lesher, who said the pedestal alone weighs 3 tons. "We had to make sure that it was safe for the building and the community."

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