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Jockstrip: The world as we know it.

  |   Jan. 16, 2013 at 6:00 AM
Iowa library weighs sleeping ban

IOWA CITY, Iowa, Jan. 15 (UPI) -- Snoozing may join loud talking on the list of things you can't do at the library in Iowa City, Iowa, where officials are considering a siesta ban.

The library's board of trustees took up the issue of sleeping patrons after staff members said it had become a recurring problem.

Iowa City Public Library Director Susan Craig said the library wants to be sensitive to homeless people while simultaneously ensuring the facility's limited amount of space is being used for its intended purpose, the Iowa City Press-Citizen reported Tuesday.

Craig said not everyone caught sleeping at the library is homeless and a sleeping ban would be uniformly enforced.

"If it's a 20-year-old sitting there with a textbook in front of them and they're asleep, you treat them the same way you would as someone who is dressed in a less put-together kind of way, is slumped down in their chair and has their coat over their head," Craig said. "So if you have a rule, it has to be enforced for everybody, and that's only fair."

The library board said it will consider adding a sleeping ban to its code of conduct at a meeting this month.


Police: Son stole, froze dad's body

DETROIT, Jan. 15 (UPI) -- Detroit police said a man accused of stealing his 93-year-old father's body from a cemetery told family members he planned to resurrect his dad through prayer.

Police Sgt. Eren Stephens said officers discovered the body of the man in a new freezer in the basement of his 48-year-old son's home early Tuesday morning after he allegedly took the corpse and casket from Gethsemane Cemetery Monday, the Detroit Free Press reported Tuesday.

Investigators said the body was taken Monday morning, two days after the funeral. The body was being kept in a mausoleum because the ground was too wet for burial.

The 48-year-old allegedly told family members Monday he stole the body to resurrect his father through prayer.

The son was taken into custody, but charges against him were not released.


Woman finds wad of cash in the snow

MADISON, Wis., Jan. 15 (UPI) -- Police in Wisconsin said they were trying to determine the origin of a "significant" amount of cash a woman found in the snow as she was walking to work.

The Madison Police Department said the 43-year-old woman was walking to work Monday morning on the near east side of the city when she spotted a large denomination bill in the snow near the sidewalk, WISC-TV, Madison, reported Tuesday.

The woman went in for a closer look and discovered several more bills spread out in the area. She turned the cash over to police.

Police said they would not released the exact amount of cash, "but suffice to say it is significant."

Police Lt. Cory Nelson told the Wisconsin State Journal anyone thinking of claiming the money if it is not legitimately theirs should keep in mind it is a crime to file a false police report.

"If anybody claims it, they'll need to know how much was missing," he said. "They might also need to provide some kind of receipt if they had just come from a bank."

Nelson said the money could be given to the woman who found it if no one comes forward with a valid claim on it.

"I give the lady who turned it in credit," he said. "Not a lot of people would have done that."


18 human heads found in airport shipment

CHICAGO, Jan. 15 (UPI) -- Customs officials said a shipment of 18 human heads destined for cremation was seized at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago because of a paperwork snafu.

The Chicago Tribune reported Tuesday the shipment arrived in late December but the paperwork was incomplete and it was unclear where it was supposed to go.

News stories surrounding the shipment Tuesday prompted a suburban company to notify authorities it was the intended recipient.

The heads had been embalmed and had been used for medical research, a spokesman for the Cook County medical examiner's office said. They had been shipped from Rome aboard Lufthansa.

It wasn't clear why the heads were transported halfway around the world to be cremated.

The medical examiner's office had been holding the heads for safekeeping since the week before Christmas.

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