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Jockstrip: The world as we know it.

  |   May 7, 2012 at 6:00 AM
Women's sex fantasy involves Eiffel Tower

PARSIPPANY, N.Y., May 7 (UPI) -- One-in-3 U.S. women fantasize about a sexual rendezvous on the Eiffel Tower, while men prefer the White House, a survey found.

The survey, conducted by Harris Interactive among a total of 29,003 U.S. adults for condom maker Durex, found 46 percent of respondents said they were more likely to see Big Foot than climax at the same time as their partner.

Half of Americans said they felt dissatisfied with the duration of their bedroom escapades -- 37 percent of respondents admitted the time they spend being intimate ends too quickly, while 14 percent revealed that sex lasts longer than they would like.

This dissatisfaction has led to 75 percent of men and 66 percent of women trying to change the pace while making love, the survey indicated.

"This gap in satisfaction is something that has been occurring forever," Kevin Harshaw, marketing director of personal care at Reckitt Benckiser, parent company of Durex, said in a statement.

The survey was conducted Sept. 6 to Oct. 3. No margin of error was provided.


Lug nuts stolen from Chicago cop cars

CHICAGO, May 6 (UPI) -- Chicago police were investigating the theft of lug nuts from squad cars sitting in a police station parking lot on the city's Southwest Side, officials said.

The lug nuts began disappearing about a week ago, the Chicago Sun-Times reported.

No officers have been involved in road accidents because of the apparent vandalism, officials said.

"It's not funny," one Morgan Park District officer said Saturday. "You could lose control and run into a building or a person or another car."

No suspects had been identified, but officers also discovered a concrete slab in the Morgan Park District police parking lot painted with an anarchy symbol, officials said.


First-grader sings LMFAO song, suspended

AURORA, Colo., May 6 (UPI) -- A Colorado grade school student was suspended for singing the signature line from LMFAO's song "Sexy and I Know It," school officials said.

D'Avonte Meadows, a first-grader at an Aurora elementary school, was suspended for three days for alleged sexual harassment, KMGH-TV, Denver, reported.

"I only just said the song," D'Avonte said. "I'm sexy and I know it."

D'Avonte said recited the lyric while he and a girl were standing in lunch line for lunch.

"I could understand if he was fondling her, looking up her skirt, trying to look in her shirt. That, to me, is sexual harassment," said Stephanie Meadows, D'Avonte's mother. "I'm just, I'm floored. They're going to look at him like he's a pervert. And it's like, that's not fair to him."

It was a repeat performance for the boy. Meadows said her son had quoted the same line from the same song to the same girl last month, and that time was seen "shaking his booty" near the girl's face.

"I'm going to definitely have to sit with him and see if he understands exactly what the song means," Meadows said. "I think it's kind of overwhelming. You know, sexual harassment on a 6-year-old? I don't understand. You know, kids are kids."


Woman says hypnotized into $160,000 loss

BOSTON, May 5 (UPI) -- Boston's Chinatown has been on edge since a 57-year-old woman claimed three women used hypnosis to get her to fork over $160,000 in life savings, police say.

Police say the victim was food shopping in Chinatown April 15 when the trio of women tapped her on the shoulder and began asking her questions. The victim says one of the suspects spoke and her henchwomen handed her a plastic bag. She was told to go home and meet them several hours later on Boston Common.

The victim filled the bag with a necklace, a jade bracelet, two gold rings, her passport and $160,000 in cash. She then went to the meeting spot and handed over the fortune.

The incident has Chinatown on alert, with two similar shakedowns reported since then. Mark Liu, director of Boston's Chinese Progressive Association, has warned members to remain vigilant when approached by strangers.

"It seems like it's something that's potentially very dangerous," Liu told the Boston Herald. "I think the elderly are particularly vulnerable because they obviously would have a hard time just walking away."

Liu said rumors of hypnotizing thieves have roots in Chinese lore. He said his mother warned him of them when he was a child in Hong Kong.

Clinical hypnotist Harvey Zarren has his doubts.

"Having somebody instantaneously hypnotize you on the street and you turn over huge amounts of valuables, to me, sounds a little unlikely," he said. "I look at this story and I say somebody is going to have to prove this to me."

© 2012 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
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