account
search
search

Jockstrip: The world as we know it.

  |   Jan. 21, 2011 at 6:00 AM
Brothers arrested after baseball bat fight

SANDUSKY, Ohio, Jan. 21 (UPI) -- Police in Ohio said two brothers were arrested after allegedly giving one another head wounds with a baseball bat.

Sandusky police said David Abrams, 49, was doing laundry at the home of his brother, Stuart Abrams, 50, when the pair began to argue, the Sandusky Register reported.

Stuart Abrams said his brother tried to goad him into a fight, so he told him to leave. He said he went and got a baseball bat from his room when David refused.

Stuart said David shoved him so he struck him in the head with the bat.

The police report said Stuart went outside to cool off and David picked up the bat, followed him and struck him in the head.

Police said there was blood in the house and a bloody bat was outside in the snow when they arrived.

The brothers were treated at Firelands Regional Medical Center and each charged with felonious assault and domestic violence.


Alleged tomato thief leads to stolen items

ST. PAUL, Minn., Jan. 21 (UPI) -- Minnesota officials said a phone call from a man accused of stealing a tomato led them to property stolen from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Police said Timothy Keith Heidenreich, 39, placed a call Wednesday from the Washington County Jail asking a friend named Terry for help moving "at least $15,000 (worth of) stuff," the St. Paul (Minn.) Pioneer-Press reported.

Investigators said Heidenreich, who was in jail for allegedly stealing a tomato from a lunchroom, told the man where to find the items and asked him to move them to a home.

Police arrested Will Houston Hague, 47, and Shane James Rylander, 40, who allegedly were caught driving a van containing some of the items taken in the DNR break-in. Items taken during the crime included about 20 animal mounts as well as chain saws and power tools.

Hague and Rylander denied knowing the items were stolen and were released pending further investigation.

"Formal charges could be filed at a later time," St. Paul police spokesman John Keating said.


Texas man sets record for golf rounds

DALLAS, Jan. 21 (UPI) -- A Texas man says he has attained his goal of setting a world record by playing 600 rounds of golf in one year.

Richard Lewis set out to last year to get his name in the Guinness Book of Records by playing up to 56 holes of golf a day, WFAA-TV, Dallas/Fort Worth, reported.

"These feet have walked 4,000 miles," Lewis, who refused to use a golf cart for his record attempt, said. "I'm addicted; what can I say?"

"If nobody knew about this, I would be just as satisfied, because I know I did it and no one else in the whole wide world has ever done it," he said. "That is special to me."

Lewis, 64, admits his obsession with the sport led to two divorces, but that the golf course is the place that makes him happiest.

"You have to be a little over the edge to do this," Lewis concedes.

The Guinness Book of Records required Lewis to sign in and out with golf pros to prove he had completed each round.

In the end he played 611 rounds of golf, 11 more than he expected.

His average score per round was 78.5.


Dog rescued from frozen pond

BOSTON, Jan. 21 (UPI) -- Massachusetts rescuers said they were finally able to ensnare a dog trapped on a frozen reservoir after the canine spent several days avoiding humans.

The Animal Rescue League of Boston said the 4-year-old sheltie mix, named Gibson, was rescued from the frozen reservoir Wednesday in Cambridge by a team of six rescuers who were able to trap the dog in a net while riding four-wheelers, The Boston Globe reported.

Brian O'Connor, rescue services manager for the Animal Rescue League, said the dog's owner said she had been missing for more than a week and she spent several days evading rescuers on the fenced-in pond.

"How she got in, nobody knows, but she obviously couldn't get out," O'Connor said.

O'Connor said Gibson was checked out by a veterinarian and was sent home with her owner Wednesday night.

© 2011 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
x
Feedback