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Jockstrip: The world as we know it.

  |   Nov. 8, 2007 at 6:00 AM
Dutch politicians consider new island

AMSTERDAM, Netherlands, Nov. 7 (UPI) -- Some Dutch politicians are refloating the idea of constructing a new island in the North Sea.

Joop Atsma, agriculture spokesman for the Christian Democrats, said he wants the government to consider the idea, which has been discussed on and off for decades, Radio Netherlands reported Wednesday.

Atsma said the project would be expensive, but noted that an estimated $15 billion would be needed to purchase existing land to meet housing and other needs.

"For that amount, you could do a lot. So the question, is building an island worth it? I say, absolutely," he said.

However, many experts say the country's current efforts to add hundreds of acres of land to the country's cost is a cheaper alternative to the island idea, the report said.

"The basic principle of reclaiming the new land is building with nature -- making more use of materials and forces present in nature," said Ronald Waterman, a specialist working on the project. "We are doing all this in order to create a new flexible, dynamic coast in which accretion and erosion are more or less in balance."


Political battle turns physical for pair

PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 7 (UPI) -- Pennsylvania Democrat Stephen Smith and Republican councilman Jack Shingle are used to fighting over issues, but a sign turned their battle physical.

Upper Darby Township Minority Inspector Ed Boyle said a Republican campaign poster placed at a local polling location prompted Smith to become so angry he lashed out at his political rival Tuesday, the Delaware County Times said Wednesday.

"It was posted right by the door. Steve went in to complain and spoke to both judges and the general response was, 'No,'" Boyle said of Smith's unsuccessful attempt to have the sign removed.

"Steve was walking out when Jack walked over behind him saying, 'You're always whining,'" Boyle added.

Boyle told the Times it was that comment that proved too much for Smith, who immediately attacked the councilman.

The 63-year-old Republican received minor injuries, while the 37-year-old Democrat was arrested and is now facing multiple criminal charges.

The offending sign remained in place.


Survey: Chicago most caffeinated U.S. city

NORWALK, Conn., Nov. 7 (UPI) -- A recent survey of the most caffeinated cities in the United States found that residents of Chicago indulge in the stimulant the most.

The HealthSaver Caffeinated Cities Survey found that in terms of overall caffeine consumption habits, Chicago edged out Tampa, Fla., for the top spot on the list, a HealthSaver release said Tuesday.

Miami meanwhile nabbed enough respondent votes to take third place on the list, while the top five most caffeinated cities were rounded off with Phoenix in fourth and Atlanta in fifth.

On the flip side of the list, San Francisco and Oakland, Calif., were tagged with the title of least caffeinated city in the United States.

The two neighboring California cities were followed on the least list by Philadelphia, New York and Detroit respectively.

Olympic gold medalist Peggy Fleming said the survey showed how prevalent caffeine has become in the U.S. culture.

"With the advent of rich, high-end coffees, soaring popularity of energy drinks and national fascination with green tea," the HealthSaver spokeswoman said, "our HealthSaver Caffeinated Cities Survey has brewed up some very interesting trends, findings and results."


Church phone a hotline to sex, not heaven

CLARKTOWN, N.Y., Nov. 7 (UPI) -- A homeless man rang up some trouble after he broke into a church to use a phone to call a sex hotline, police in a New York community said.

Clarkstown, N.Y., police said James Macnair may have strained the bounds of charity of the Elim Alliance Church when he used the phone for the less-than-holy conversations -- not once, but twice, New York television station WCBS reported Wednesday.

"He broke into the church in Valley Cottage to use the phone there to call a sex hotline," said Clarkstown Police Sgt. Harry Baumann.

Baumann said Macnair picked the lock and entered the church Friday, and was asked to leave by the church treasurer, who didn't call the police.

On Monday, when the church treasurer stopped by again, she found Macnair again in the church and again on the phone. This time, though she called the police.

"My understanding is he's homeless, he doesn't have a phone," said Baumann. "This is the place that he found a phone."

© 2007 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
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