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  |   Sept. 25, 2007 at 6:00 AM
Jesse James was sued in 1870 over horse

KANSAS CITY, Mo., Sept. 25 (UPI) -- A Missouri lawyer has discovered documents detailing what is believed to be the only successful lawsuit brought against the 19th century gunslinger Jesse James.

Henry McDougal, who practiced in Daviess County, northeast of Kansas City, not only sued James and his brother, Frank, but also obtained a judgment, collected and lived to tell the tale, The Kansas City Star reported Monday.

Jim Muehlberger is the Kansas City lawyer who uncovered the documents detailing the litigation.

"It’s an example of equal justice under the law," Muehlberger said. "The criminal justice system would be completely unable to deal with Jesse James for about 10 years. But here the system worked, in a civil case, through the courage of a very young lawyer."

In January 1870, McDougal, then 25, sued Jesse and Frank James, seeking compensation for a mare, saddle and bridle the brothers stole at gunpoint following a deadly bank heist.

The owner of the horse estimated his loss to be at about $223.50.

The James brothers retained an attorney and the legal battle lasted 21 months before it was resolved.


Britain's fastest speeder jailed

LONDON, Sept. 24 (UPI) -- Britain’s fastest speeder ever, who was caught going 172 miles-per-hour, was banned from driving for three years and sentenced to 10 weeks in jail.

Tim Brady, 33, was caught in a random speed check while driving his nearly $200,000 3.6-liter Porsche 911 Turbo in January, London’s Daily Mail reported.

The previous record for the highest speed resulting in a conviction was 156mph.

Brady was sentenced Monday at the Oxford Crown Court, where he pleaded guilty to one count of dangerous driving last month.

He also resigned from his job at car lease firm Helphire, where he got the Porsche.


Attacker seeks revenge on wrong man

MILWAUKEE, Sept. 24 (UPI) -- Milwaukee police said a drunken, sword-wielding man meant to attack his friend, but assaulted the wrong person, severing the victim's pinky finger.

Officers said the 24-year-old assailant was so drunk on his way to the apartment that he hit several cars parked on a nearby street. While en route to his friend's apartment in the building, he attacked one door with the samurai-like blade, causing a lot of damage, WISN-TV, Milwaukee, reported.

He apparently kicked in and struck the last door with the weapon, police said. When someone opened the door, the man went after him with the sword, severing a finger.

Police said the victim -- who didn't know his assailant -- forced the man out of the building. An off-duty police officer who lives nearby heard the commotion, arrested the man and took him to jail.

The victim was taken to the hospital and released.


Big-game hunter donates trophies to UConn

STORRS, Conn., Sept. 24 (UPI) -- Stuffed lions and bears -- no tigers -- have been donated to the University of Connecticut's Museum of Natural History by the widow of a big-game hunter.

The stuffed animals right for the moment are stored in a modular building on campus. Eventually, they'll be displayed, loaned out and used in classes, The Hartford (Conn.) Courant reported Monday.

The 116 stuffed beasts were donated to the university by the widow of big-game hunter Henry Budney of Newington, Conn., an sportsman who hunted in Africa, India and Mongolia since the 1950s. He displayed his prize specimens in a trophy room that he had built onto his home.

"It's a nice, kind of comprehensive, look at what he was doing," museum director Leanne Kennedy Harty said. "At that time, this was actually a really cool kind of outdoorsman lifestyle."

While there are similar taxidermy collections around, the Budney collection is in exceptionally good shape and the taxidermy work was of the highest quality, Harty said.

Besides the collection, Julia Budney donated $1 million for the animals' upkeep and to help pay for the 3,000-square-foot expansion planned behind the museum.

Topics: Jesse James
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