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Jockstrip: The World As We Know It

By PENNY NELSON BARTHOLOMEW, United Press International   |   March 28, 2002 at 8:32 AM
DUSTY

The remnants of a massive dust storm that blew out of China's remote Gobi Desert last week are expected to pass over California during the next few days.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said scientists stationed along the coast are poised to take measurements of the thinning cloud with laser radars known as Lidar, and with balloons launched from Trinidad Head near Eureka, Calif.

While it's likely to be largely unnoticed in California, the dust definitely made its presence known last week in Asia. A NOAA satellite image taken on Sunday clearly showed the cloud spreading over Korea, the Sea of Japan and the Yellow Sea.

Chinese media reported the storm blew an estimated 30,000 tons of dust and sand into Beijing and reached Japan and Korea as well. Visibility in the Chinese capital dropped to 100 yards at times and many residents were forced to don masks to keep from breathing in particles.


THINGS WE DON'T UNDERSTAND

The National Labor Relations Board held hearings this week on charges by a Miami nursing home that a union used voodoo to organize its employees.

On Feb. 28, nursing assistants along with housekeeping, dietary and laundry workers at the Mt. Sinai-St. Francis Nursing and Rehabilitation Center voted to join the Service Employees International Union. The nursing home filed objections with the NLRB, accusing union representatives of intimidation and harassment.

The nursing home's employees are mostly Haitians, as are many of the union organizers.

During the hearing, dietary workers at the center testified that pennies would appear on the floor and half-filled cups of water would occasionally appear on a high shelf in the break room. Several workers testified they were afraid to touch them because they were symbols of black magic.

In addition, chief organizer Marie Jean Phillippe was accused of fingering black voodoo beads the day of the election. Phillippe, a Catholic, said they were rosary beads.

Voodoo is a Caribbean religion with roots in Africa. Followers believe in a Supreme God and powerful spirits, but many people associate voodoo with the dark arts.


NEWS OF OTHER LIFE FORMS

Former British foreign secretary Robin Cook claims the British national dish is now Chicken Tikka Masala -- and now Queen Elizabeth II has broken with all royal protocol to pen an introduction for a curry cookery book, titled "Favorite Recipes Of The Raj." It's for a good cause -- with proceeds going to Britain's Cancer Research Campaign -- and includes recipes from singer Tom Jones, the prime minister's wife, Cherie Blair, actress Glenda Jackson and veteran soccer star Kevin Keegan.

(From UPI Hears)


TODAY'S SIGN THE WORLD IS ENDING

The man known as "Uncle Miltie" and "Mr. Television" since his pioneering days as a network TV performer is dead. Milton Berle died Wednesday at a Southern California hospice following a yearlong battle with colon cancer. He was 93.


AND FINALLY, TODAY'S UPLIFTING STORY

The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences has named six new inductees for its Hall of Fame -- including three key players on the legendary CBS variety series, "The Carol Burnett Show."

Comic actors Harvey Korman and Tim Conway and costume designer Bob Mackie, will go into the hall, along with Jean Stapleton, John Frankenheimer and Bud Yorkin.

Korman won Emmys for his work on "Burnett" in 1969, 1971, 1972 and 1974. Conway won Emmys for the show in 1973, 1977 and 1978. Mackie has won eight Emmys for his designs for specials starring Burnett, Cher and Diana Ross and the Supremes. Stapleton won three Emmys (1971-72, '78) playing Edith Bunker on "All in the Family." She was nominated five other times. Frankenheimer directed more than 150 live programs during the 1950s and won Emmys for directing in 1994 ("Against the Wall"), 1995 ("The Burning Season"), 1996 ("Andersonville") and 1998 ("George Wallace"). Yorkin and his partner Norman Lear produced such classic TV comedies as "All in the Family," "Maude," "Good Times" and "Sanford and Son."

(Thanks to UPI Hollywood Reporter Pat Nason)

© 2002 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
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