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Gulf oil spill cleanup and response (41 images)

Gas from the damaged Deepwater Horizon wellhead is burned by the drillship Discoverer Enterprise in a process known as flaring in the Gulf of Mexico on May 16, 2010. Gas and oil from the wellhead are being brought to the surface via a tube that was placed inside the damaged pipe. UPI/Patrick Kelley/USCG
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Dr. Erica Miller, a member of the Louisiana State Wildlife Response Team, cleanses a pelican of oil at the Clean Gulf Associates Mobile Wildlife Rehabilitation Station on Ft. Jackson in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, on May 15, 2010. The station stood up to provide support for animals that are affected as a result of the April 20 explosion on Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit Deepwater Horizon. UPI/Justin Stumberg/US Navy
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The mobile offshore drilling unit (MODU) Development Driller II (near) is prepared to drill a relief well at the Deepwater Horizon site on May 18, 2010, as the MODU Q4000 holds position directly over the damaged blowout preventer in the Gulf of Mexico. While the drillship Discover Enterprise (far) continues to capture oil from the ruptured riser, preparations for the possible utilization of a "junk shot" or the "top kill" method are being made aboard the Q4000. UPI/Patrick Kelley/USCG
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Reponse to Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico
Gas from the damaged Deepwater Horizon wellhead is burned by the drillship Discoverer Enterprise in a process known as flaring in the Gulf of Mexico on May 16, 2010. Gas and oil from the wellhead are being brought to the surface via a tube that was placed inside the damaged pipe. UPI/Patrick Kelley/USCG
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NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible satellite image of the Gulf oil spill on May 17, 2010 from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Instrument on-board. The oil slick appears as a dull gray on the water's surface and stretches south from the Mississippi Delta with what looks like a tail. From top left to top right are the states Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. Scientists are worried that the huge plumes of oil could get into a current that would take the oil around Florida. UPI/NASA
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BP America Chairman and President Lamar McKay testifies before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing titled "Gulf Coast Catastrophe: Assessing the Nation's Response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill" on Capitol Hill in Washington on May 17, 2010. UPI/Roger L. Wollenberg
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Clean up crews search the shores of Dauphin Island, Alabama for any tar balls that may have washed ashore on May 14, 2010. The main oil leak caused by the April 20 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon rig continues to spill thousands of barrels of oil a day into the Gulf of Mexico. UPI/Harrison McClary/BP
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