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Thousands of visitors come to the Jinju Namgang Yudeung Festival, or the Jinju Lantern Festival, to see the giant paper lanterns floating in the Namgang River in Jinju, South Korea on October 1, 2012. The festival, which runs Oct. 1 to 14, originated during the Japanese invasion of 1592 when Koreans lit lanterns to illuminate the Namgang River surrounding Jinjuseong Fortress to prevent Japanese troops from crossing. A tradition during the festival are the floating lanterns carrying peoples wishes. UPI/Thomas Michael Corcoran
An assortment of paper lanterns on display made by visitors at the Jinju Namgang Yudeung Festival, or the Jinju Lantern Festival, in Jinju, South Korea on October 1, 2012. The festival, which runs Oct. 1 to 14, originated during the Japanese invasion of 1592 when Koreans lit lanterns to illuminate the Namgang River surrounding Jinjuseong Fortress to prevent Japanese troops from crossing. A tradition during the festival are the floating lanterns carrying peoples wishes. UPI/Thomas Michael Corcoran
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Visitors glow red in a tunnel of festival lanterns at the Jinju Namgang Yudeung Festival, or the Jinju Lantern Festival, in Jinju, South Korea on October 1, 2012. The festival, which runs Oct. 1 to 14, originated during the Japanese invasion of 1592 when Koreans lit lanterns to illuminate the Namgang River surrounding Jinjuseong Fortress to prevent Japanese troops from crossing. A tradition during the festival are the floating lanterns carrying peoples wishes. UPI/Thomas Michael Corcoran
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Thousands of visitors come to the Jinju Namgang Yudeung Festival, or the Jinju Lantern Festival, to see the giant paper lanterns floating in the Namgang River in Jinju, South Korea on October 1, 2012. The festival, which runs Oct. 1 to 14, originated during the Japanese invasion of 1592 when Koreans lit lanterns to illuminate the Namgang River surrounding Jinjuseong Fortress to prevent Japanese troops from crossing. A tradition during the festival are the floating lanterns carrying peoples wishes. UPI/Thomas Michael Corcoran
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Lantern Festival in sourth Korea
Thousands of visitors come to the Jinju Namgang Yudeung Festival, or the Jinju Lantern Festival, to see the giant paper lanterns floating in the Namgang River in Jinju, South Korea on October 1, 2012. The festival, which runs Oct. 1 to 14, originated during the Japanese invasion of 1592 when Koreans lit lanterns to illuminate the Namgang River surrounding Jinjuseong Fortress to prevent Japanese troops from crossing. A tradition during the festival are the floating lanterns carrying peoples wishes. UPI/Thomas Michael Corcoran
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Thousands of visitors come to the Jinju Namgang Yudeung Festival, or the Jinju Lantern Festival, to see the giant paper lanterns floating in the Namgang River in Jinju, South Korea on October 1, 2012. The festival, which runs Oct. 1 to 14, originated during the Japanese invasion of 1592 when Koreans lit lanterns to illuminate the Namgang River surrounding Jinjuseong Fortress to prevent Japanese troops from crossing. A tradition during the festival are the floating lanterns carrying peoples wishes. UPI/Thomas Michael Corcoran
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Sue-hyung Yang is dressed as an ancient Korean military officer at the Jinju Namgang Yudeung Festival, or the Jinju Lantern Festival, in Jinju, South Korea on October 1, 2012. The festival, which runs Oct. 1 to 14, originated during the Japanese invasion of 1592 when Koreans lit lanterns to illuminate the Namgang River surrounding Jinjuseong Fortress to prevent Japanese troops from crossing. A tradition during the festival are the floating lanterns carrying peoples wishes. UPI/Thomas Michael Corcoran
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Lantern Festival in sourth Korea
A paper lantern shaped as a soldier drinking stands his post in Jinjuseoung Fortress during the first day of the Jinju Namgang Yudeung Festival, or the Jinju Lantern Festival, in Jinju, South Korea on October 1, 2012. The festival, which runs Oct. 1 to 14, originated during the Japanese invasion of 1592 when Koreans lit lanterns to illuminate the Namgang River surrounding Jinjuseong Fortress to prevent Japanese troops from crossing. A tradition during the festival are the floating lanterns carrying peoples wishes. UPI/Thomas Michael Corcoran
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