Images from NASA's Cassini mission to Saturn (9 images)

A look at some of the images captured from NASA's Cassini mission.
Updated: Feb. 3, 2017 at 3:58 PM
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Saturn's icy moon Mimas is dwarfed by the planet's enormous rings. The rings, which are made of small, icy particles spread over a vast area, are extremely thin – generally no thicker than the height of a house. The image was taken in red light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on July 21, 2016. Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/UPI
This view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft was obtained about half a day before its first close pass by the outer edges of Saturn's main rings during its penultimate mission phase on Dec. 3, 2016. The view shows part of the giant, hexagon-shaped jet stream around the planet's north pole. Each side of the hexagon is about as wide as Earth. Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/UPI
This false-color view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft resembles Jupiter but actually shows clouds in Saturn's northern hemisphere – made using images taken by Cassini's wide-angle camera on July 20, 2016, using a combination of spectral filters sensitive to infrared light. Filters like these, which are sensitive to absorption and scattering of sunlight by methane in Saturn's atmosphere, have been useful throughout Cassini's mission for determining the structure and depth of cloud features in the atmosphere. Image via NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/Kevin M. Gill
It may look as though Saturn's moon Mimas is crashing through the planet's rings in this image taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft on October 23, 2016, but Mimas is actually 28,000 miles away from the rings. There is a strong connection between the icy moon and Saturn's rings, though. Gravity links them together and shapes the way they both move. Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/UPI
The image, taken in violet light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Oct. 28, 2016, shows the sunlit side of Saturn's rings from about 25 degrees (if Saturn is dominant in image) above the ring plane. No Earth-based telescope could ever capture a view quite like this since Earth-based views can only show Saturn's daylit side. Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/UPI
Tethys, one of Saturn's larger icy moons, vaguely resembles an eyeball staring off into space in this January 23, 2017 view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The resemblance is due to the enormous crater, Odysseus, and its complex of central peaks. Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/UPI
Dione's lit hemisphere faces away from Cassini's camera, yet the moon's darkened surface features are dimly illuminated in this image, due to Saturnshine. Photo by NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute/UPI