China turns decommissioned nuclear plant into tourist attraction (27 images)

Chinese tourists visit the formerly top secret, now decommissioned, 816 Nuclear Military Plant buried underground in Fuling District, a few hours outside of Chongqing, one of four direct-controlled municipalities in China, on November 5, 2016.

The abandoned military nuclear facility, hailed as the world's largest man-made cave system, was built capable of withstanding attacks using atomic and hydrogen bombs. Constructed in the 1960s to manufacture nuclear plutonium, it remained active until 1984 and has recently been opened up to tourists.
Updated: Nov. 7, 2016 at 4:14 PM
Chinese tourists visit the decommissioned, once top secret, China 816 Nuclear Military Plant buried into a mountain in Fuling District, a few hours outside of Chongqing, one of four direct-controlled municipalities in China, on November 5, 2016. The abandoned military nuclear facility, hailed as the world's largest man-made cave system able to withstand atomic and hydrogen bombs, has recently opened to tourists. It was designed to manufacture nuclear plutonium in the 1960s but was stopped from doing so in 1984. Photo by Stephen Shaver/UPI
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Chinese tourists visit the decommissioned, once top secret, China 816 Nuclear Military Plant buried into a mountain in Fuling District, a few hours outside of Chongqing, one of four direct-controlled municipalities in China, on November 5, 2016. The abandoned military nuclear facility, hailed as the world's largest man-made cave system able to withstand atomic and hydrogen bombs, has recently opened to tourists. It was designed to manufacture nuclear plutonium in the 1960s but was stopped from doing so in 1984. Photo by Stephen Shaver/UPI
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Chinese tourists visit the decommissioned, once top secret, China 816 Nuclear Military Plant buried into a mountain in Fuling District, a few hours outside of Chongqing, one of four direct-controlled municipalities in China, on November 5, 2016. The abandoned military nuclear facility, hailed as the world's largest man-made cave system able to withstand atomic and hydrogen bombs, has recently opened to tourists. It was designed to manufacture nuclear plutonium in the 1960s but was stopped from doing so in 1984. Photo by Stephen Shaver/UPI
License photo | Permalink
Chinese tourists visit the decommissioned, once top secret, China 816 Nuclear Military Plant buried into a mountain in Fuling District, a few hours outside of Chongqing, one of four direct-controlled municipalities in China, on November 5, 2016. The abandoned military nuclear facility, hailed as the world's largest man-made cave system able to withstand atomic and hydrogen bombs, has recently opened to tourists. It was designed to manufacture nuclear plutonium in the 1960s but was stopped from doing so in 1984. Photo by Stephen Shaver/UPI
License photo | Permalink
Chinese tourists visit the decommissioned, once top secret, China 816 Nuclear Military Plant buried into a mountain in Fuling District, a few hours outside of Chongqing, one of four direct-controlled municipalities in China, on November 5, 2016. The abandoned military nuclear facility, hailed as the world's largest man-made cave system able to withstand atomic and hydrogen bombs, has recently opened to tourists. It was designed to manufacture nuclear plutonium in the 1960s but was stopped from doing so in 1984. Photo by Stephen Shaver/UPI
License photo | Permalink
Chinese tourists visit the decommissioned, once top secret, China 816 Nuclear Military Plant buried into a mountain in Fuling District, a few hours outside of Chongqing, one of four direct-controlled municipalities in China, on November 5, 2016. The abandoned military nuclear facility, hailed as the world's largest man-made cave system able to withstand atomic and hydrogen bombs, has recently opened to tourists. It was designed to manufacture nuclear plutonium in the 1960s but was stopped from doing so in 1984. Photo by Stephen Shaver/UPI
License photo | Permalink
Chinese tourists visit the decommissioned, once top secret, China 816 Nuclear Military Plant buried into a mountain in Fuling District, a few hours outside of Chongqing, one of four direct-controlled municipalities in China, on November 5, 2016. The abandoned military nuclear facility, hailed as the world's largest man-made cave system able to withstand atomic and hydrogen bombs, has recently opened to tourists. It was designed to manufacture nuclear plutonium in the 1960s but was stopped from doing so in 1984. Photo by Stephen Shaver/UPI
License photo | Permalink