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Companies may face legal action for false claims about products to cure autism

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it approved medications that can help some with autism manage symptoms, but parents should be warned there is no cure for autism despite the claims of some companies.
By Alex Cukan   |   April 25, 2014 at 6:14 PM   |   Comments

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WASHINGTON, April 25 (UPI) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it approved medications that can help some with autism manage symptoms, but parents should be warned there is no cure for autism despite the claims of some companies.

“Autism varies widely in severity and symptoms,” Dr. Amy Taylor, a pediatrician at FDA, said in a statement. “Existing autism therapies and interventions are designed to remedy specific symptoms and can bring about improvement."

Gary Coody, FDA’s national health fraud coordinator, said a number of companies are facing possible legal action if they continue to make false or misleading claims about products and therapies claiming to treat or cure autism including:

-- Chelation therapies claim to cleanse the body of toxic chemicals and heavy metals by binding to them and “removing” them from circulation using sprays, suppositories, capsules, liquid drops and clay baths. However FDA-approved chelating agents approved for specific uses, such as the treatment of lead poisoning and iron overload, are available, but by prescription only. FDA-approved prescription chelation therapy products should only be used under medical supervision. Re

moving needed minerals can lead to serious and life-threatening outcomes.

-- Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy involves breathing oxygen in a pressurized chamber. It has been cleared by FDA for certain medical uses, such as treating decompression sickness suffered by divers, but it has not been cleared for autism.

-- Miracle Mineral Solution, or Miracle Mineral Supplement, becomes a potent chemical when mixed according to package directions. Consumers reported to the FDA they experienced nausea, severe vomiting and life-threatening low blood pressure after drinking the solution and citrus juice mixture.

-- Detoxifying Clay Baths claim to draw out chemical toxins, pollutants and heavy metals from the body, falsely offering “dramatic improvement” for autism symptoms.

-- CocoKefir probiotics products are not proven safe and effective for its advertised use to "recover from autism."

© 2014 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
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