Survey: Most family caregivers lie to those they're caring for

April 22, 2013 at 5:27 PM
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NAPLES, Fla., April 22 (UPI) -- Seventy-three percent of U.S. adults who care for an elderly parent of family member admit to lying to the person they're caring for, a survey indicates.

AgingCare.com surveyed more than 700 people taking care of an elderly parent or family member and found:

-- Of the 73 percent of family caregivers, who admitted to lying to the person they're caring for; 43 percent lied on a weekly basis.

-- Half who admitted to lying said it was justified because it either made their own life easier or it's for the elderly family member's "own good."

-- Only 28 percent, who lied said it was wrong and felt guilty.

Family caregivers are most honest about their loved one's medical condition and least honest about their own feelings: 65 percent lied about their own feelings, while 10 percent lied about their loved one's medical reports or test results.

The AgingCare.com Caregiver Forum provides an outlet for caregiver honesty; members can share their candid feelings or worries without condemnation, without guilt and without hurting the one they love.

For example, one forum member said: "People tell me how great I am for taking care of my mom and when they tell me this I feel worse because of the way I really feel deep inside. I want my life back."

Another member said, "I'm usually pretty compassionate but people who compare taking care of someone with dementia to taking care of a child should be whomped upside the head."

No survey details were provided.

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