U.S. eating a diet low in saturated flat

April 4, 2013 at 6:01 PM

HYATTSVILLE, Md., April 4 (UPI) -- From the 1970s to 1994, U.S. adults eating a diet low in saturated fat rose from 25 percent to 41 percent, but little changed through 2010, officials say.

A report by the National Center for Health Statistics, part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, found an increased percentage of adults met guidelines for low saturated-fat intake from the 1976-80 period to 1988-94, but the percentage remained unchanged from the 1988-94 period to 2007-10.

Dr. Elena V. Kuklina, Margaret D. Carroll, Kate M. Shaw and Dr. Rosemarie Hirsch found the percentage of adults using cholesterol-lowering medication increased from 5 percent in the late 1980s to 23 percent through 2007-10.

Each year, more than 2 million Americans suffer from acute cardiovascular events that account for about one-fourth of the total cost of inpatient hospital care. Control of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol has been shown to substantially reduce cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. High LDL can be managed with lifestyle changes, medications, or a combination of these approaches, the study authors reported.

A diet low in saturated fat is recognized as one of the most effective lifestyle changes to decrease high LDL, they said.

Related UPI Stories
Latest Headlines
Trending Stories
American Apparel files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy
Womb transplants begin in U.K. after Sweden's success
Gay Vatican priest comes out day before Pope Francis begins synod on family issues
Scientists find roadmap that may lead to 'exercise pill'
Nobel Prize in medicine awarded to parasitic disease scientists