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CDC: Most age 24 and under had oral sex

  |   Aug. 16, 2012 at 4:50 PM
ATLANTA, Aug. 16 (UPI) -- During 2007 to 2010, two-thirds of U.S. teens surveyed said they had oral sex at least once -- 66 percent of females and 65 percent of males, officials say.

Casey E. Copen, Anjani Chandra and Gladys Martinez of the Division of Vital Statistics at the National Center for Health Statistics, part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said their report presents oral sex data with opposite-sex partners among females and males based on the National Survey of Family Growth.

The report found among the 3,242 females age 15–24, 26 percent had first oral sex before first vaginal intercourse; 27 percent had oral sex after intercourse; 7.4 percent had oral sex on the same occasion as first intercourse; and 5.1 percent had oral sex, but no vaginal intercourse.

Among the 3,104 males the same age, 24 percent had first oral sex before first intercourse; 24 percent had oral sex after first intercourse; 12 percent had oral sex on the same occasion as first intercourse; and 6.5 percent had oral sex, but no vaginal intercourse, the report said.

A similar survey from 2006 to 2008, found 45 percent of females and 48 percent of males ages 15–19 said they had ever had oral sex with members of the opposite sex, and among those ages 20–24 these percentages were about 81 percent of females and 80 percent of males.

The risk of sexually transmitted infections, including human immunodeficiency virus, is lower for oral sex than for vaginal intercourse or anal sex, but several studies have documented oral sex can transmit certain sexually transmitted infections including chlamydia, genital herpes, gonorrhea and syphilis, the report said.

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