facebook
twitter
rss
account
search
search
 

Signs of Alzheimer's in those with low BMI

Nov. 24, 2011 at 12:19 PM   |   Comments

KANSAS CITY, Kan., Nov. 24 (UPI) -- The middle-aged in the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease are more likely to have lower body mass index, U.S. researchers found.

Study author Dr. Jeffrey M. Burns of the University of Kansas School of Medicine in Kansas City said the findings challenge the research that showed people who are overweight in middle age are more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease decades later than people at normal weight.

Burns and colleagues examined 506 people with advanced brain imaging techniques. They also analyzed cerebrospinal fluid to look for biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease, which can be present years before the first symptoms begin.

The participants, part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, included people with no memory problems, people with mild cognitive impairment, or mild memory problems and people with Alzheimer's disease, Burns said.

The study, published in the journal Neurology, found 85 percent of the people with mild cognitive impairment who had a body mass index below 25 had signs of the beta-amyloid plaques in their brains, compared with 48 percent of those with mild cognitive impairment who were overweight. This relationship was also found in people with no memory or thinking problems.

© 2011 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
Recommended UPI Stories
Featured UPI Collection
trending
2014: The Year in Music [PHOTOS]

2014: The Year in Music [PHOTOS]

Most Popular
1
Police search for California man with drug-resistant TB
2
New research explains insomnia prevalence among elderly
3
New data shows Melbourne is most well-rested city in the world
4
New research details rare cancer that killed Bob Marley
5
Daughters more likely than sons to care for elder parents
Trending News
Video
x
Feedback