facebook
twitter
search
search

U.S. cases of HIV-2 remain rare

July 29, 2011 at 1:16 AM

ATLANTA, July 29 (UPI) -- Human immunodeficiency virus type-2, is related to but distinct from the well-characterized AIDS retrovirus, HIV type 1, U.S. officials say.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report says HIV-2 surveillance shows reported cases of HIV-2 remain rare in the United States -- an average of only 12 diagnoses per year from 2000 to 2009 -- and are largely confined to people from West Africa. Eighty-one percent of those with HIV type-2 are from West Africa.

Sixty-six percent of the cases were reported from the Northeast and 46 percent in New York City. However, some HIV-2 cases may not have been recognized because, among reported cases, nearly 60 percent were initially misclassified as HIV-1 by the Western blot -- the test most commonly used to confirm HIV infection, the report says.

"Correct identification of HIV-2 is important because many drugs used to treat HIV-1 are not effective against HIV-2 and healthcare providers and laboratories should consider specific testing for HIV-2 if tests for HIV-1 are inconsistent or inconclusive, or imply the absence of HIV infection despite clinical evidence suggesting its presence, particularly if the patient is from West Africa," the report says. "Suspected HIV-2 cases should be reported to the state or local health department, which can conduct supplemental diagnostic tests for HIV-2 or arrange for them to be done at the CDC laboratory."

Related UPI Stories
Latest Headlines
Trending Stories
Device shown to 'smell' prostate cancer in men in trial
Scientists confirm second, more intense form of Lyme disease
Study: Sending fewer men to prison may slow spread of HIV
Einstein vindicated: Scientists find gravitational waves
Biden gathers forces to end cancer: Can he make a difference?