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Ethical conflicts in religious hospitals

April 12, 2010 at 8:45 PM   |   Comments

CHICAGO, April 12 (UPI) -- About one-fifth of U.S. doctors practicing in religiously affiliated hospitals say they've had conflicts over hospitals' end-of-life and contraception policies.

"Religious hospitals represent nearly 20 percent of our health care system," study author Dr. Debra Stulberg of the University of Chicago said in a statement. "This study is the first to systematically ask physicians whether religious hospital policies conflict with their judgment. We found that for a significant number of physicians, they do."

Ninety-six percent of primary care physicians -- a representative sample of U.S. family physicians, general internists and general practitioners in 2007 -- say physicians should adhere to hospital policy, Stulberg said.

Eighty-five percent of physicians thought a doctor facing conflict with religious policies should refer the patient to another hospital, while 10 percent said a doctor should recommend an alternate treatment not prohibited by the religious hospital.

"Primary care physicians routinely see patients facing reproductive health or end-of-life decisions that may be restricted in religious healthcare institutions, so we were not surprised to learn that nearly one in five have worked in a religious setting had a conflict with their hospital," Stulberg said.

"We found that the physicians who work in religious hospitals and practices are a diverse group, from a wide range of religious and personal backgrounds, so hospitals sponsored by a specific religious denomination have providers who may not share their beliefs."

The findings are published online ahead of print in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

© 2010 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
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