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Dyslexia linked to brain differences

June 30, 2009 at 8:59 PM   |   Comments

EDINBURGH, Scotland, June 30 (UPI) -- Scottish researchers say they found right hemisphere differences in the brains of those with dyslexia.

The study, published in BMC Neuroscience, used magnetic resonance imaging to look at the brains of both dyslexic and normal readers and then linked neurological differences to different language difficulties within the dyslexic group.

Cyril Pernet of the University of Edinburgh led a team of researchers that created a "typical brain" by combining the scans of 39 normal readers. All 38 of the brain scans of people with dyslexia revealed differences in two parts of the brain on the right side. These differences were then associated with language test performance.

"These results provide evidence for the existence of various subtypes of dyslexia characterized by different brain phenotypes," Pernet said in a statement.

"In addition, behavioral analyses suggest that these brain phenotypes relate to different deficits of automatization of language-based processes."

© 2009 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
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