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Forty percent of fertility issues male

June 18, 2009 at 3:00 PM   |   Comments

CHICAGO, June 18 (UPI) -- Fatherhood might be far from the minds of most young men, but their behavior when young can contribute to later male infertility, a U.S. researcher said.

Dr. Suzanne Kavic, a reproductive specialist at the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, said heat generated by hot tubs, excessive laptop use, or using boxers over briefs can impact sperm production, making it difficult to conceive down the road.

Other leading causes of male infertility include: enlarged varicose veins in the scrotum, genital injuries or defects, certain sexually transmitted infections, an infection or inflammation of the prostate, immune and hormonal disorders and erectile dysfunction.

"Medications for depression, blood pressure and certain heart conditions may lower libido or cause impotence," Kavic said in a statement. "Men should talk with their physicians to see if medication is necessary or if they can switch to another with fewer side effects."

Kavic also advises minimizing exposure to toxins, refraining from smoking and avoiding drugs and excessive alcohol use. To encourage fertility Kavic recommends to:

-- Exercise moderately, about one hour, three to five times per week, but avoid exercise that generates heat or trauma to the genital area.

-- Stay hydrated, limit caffeine to no more than two cups per day and eat healthfully.Take a daily multivitamin. Excessive weight gain or loss should be avoided.

-- Getting eight hours of sleep per night.

-- Practice stress reduction techniques.

© 2009 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
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