Samsung's Galaxy S5, a 'must-want' phone of the year?

Samsung's Galaxy S5, a 'must-want' phone of the year?

Smartphone companies can live or die based on the sales success, or lack of it, of their "flagship" phone -- as HTC found to its cost when the HTC One wowed reviewers but under-wowed consumers -- so all eyes will be on Barcelona in Spain when Samsung unveils it Galaxy S5 this week.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
Who will win the Nexus 6 musical chairs game?

Who will win the Nexus 6 musical chairs game?

The tech rumor mill, which never sleeps and is ever hungry for new fodder, has cranked up with a new target in its sights -- Google's next "pure-Android" flagship phone, the Nexus 6.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
Google shucks off Motorola; good idea or bad decision?

Google shucks off Motorola; good idea or bad decision?

Google, which bought Motorola Mobility in 2011 for $12.5 billion, announced last week it is selling the smartphonemaker to PC manufacturer Lenovo for $2.9 billion. Bad deal? Perhaps not, experts are saying: Think patents, not hardware.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
Is Apple, late to the phablet party, rushing to catch up?

Is Apple, late to the phablet party, rushing to catch up?

Phablet. Odd word, that. A mashup of smartphone and tablet, it's one of those construct words that pop up when technology moves too fast for the language and creates a niche genre of products for which there's no handy existing label.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International

Net neutrality case; win, loss or much ado about nothing?

The hot topic on the Internet last week -- and no doubt this week and beyond -- was a U.S. appellate court's overturning of the "net neutrality" concept under which the Internet has operated.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
New year, new technology

New year, new technology

Out with the old, in with the new. The 21st century is still young, but it's growing-up fast, technology-wise.
MICHELLE GROENKE, United Press International
Particle physicists ready to go beyond the 'God particle'

Particle physicists ready to go beyond the 'God particle'

Having been successful in their search for the Higgs boson -- the so-called "God particle" that appeared to put a big red ribbon of completion on the Standard Model of physics -- you would think particle physicists would be happy to put their feet up on the couch and bask in the glow of their accomplishment. But no, they're off on a new hunt, this time for something called "supersymmetry."
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
What's in a name? Everything

What's in a name? Everything

Have you ever sat down for a delicious dish of grilled Patagonian toothfish at your local seafood restaurant? You almost certainly have; you just didn't know it. Which brings us to the point of this article -- it's all about the name.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
Ditch that phone charge cable

Ditch that phone charge cable

The announcement last week by Japanese automaker Toyota that it will offer wireless charging for mobile phones in its redesigned 2013 Avalon is the latest indication of the spreading acceptance of the convenient way to keep a smartphone charged up and ready to go.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
Will the technological step forward by 'The Hobbit' find an audience?

Will the technological step forward by 'The Hobbit' find an audience?

As film reviewers weighed in on "The Hobbit" -- the latest offering from "Lord of the Rings" director Peter Jackson -- many gave space in their reviews for a discussion of something beyond story, acting and directing, choosing to focus on technology in the projection booth.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
Media fixes for space junkies

Media fixes for space junkies

Visitors to NASA's website are currently being greeted with a request for public input on how the space agency's site should look as the agency ponders a re-design.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
NASA says Mars discovery may not be 'one for the history books'

NASA says Mars discovery may not be 'one for the history books'

When a NASA official said last week data from an instrument on the Mars Curiosity rover suggested something "for the history books," many people thought an announcement was imminent of the possible discovery of life on the Red Planet -- until the space agency began to seriously backpedal on the story.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
Is email privacy possible?

Is email privacy possible?

The ever-widening scandal that took down David Petraeus as the head of the CIA started simply enough when Paula Broadwell, with whom he was having an affair, clicked the "send" button on her email program.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International

All work and no play?

Microsoft's confirmation of an Office Mobile app that will let users of iOS and Android devices view and edit Word, PowerPoint and Excel files on their mobile devices raises, if you're willing to give it some thought, a philosophical -- or perhaps at least sociological -- question.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
Windows 8 a Microsoft gamble?

Windows 8 a Microsoft gamble?

Microsoft's introduction of its Windows 8 operating system last week has positioned the software as the Swiss army knife of the computing universe -- desktop, laptop, notebook or tablet, Microsoft says Windows 8 is the answer for all.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
Amazon's 'razor blade' choice

Amazon's 'razor blade' choice

With the admission this week by Amazon's Jeff Bezos that the company doesn't make any money on its new Kindle Fire tablets and Paperwhite e-readers, people could be excused for asking, "Is this any way to run a business?
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
NASA's planetary playbook

NASA's planetary playbook

With the end of what was arguably NASA's marquee mission, the space shuttle program, the space agency is keen to maintain public interest in its remaining missions, especially those doing planetary exploration within our own solar system.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
Whither goest smartphones?

Whither goest smartphones?

As on-line orders for Apple's iPhone 5 soared into the millions and the die-hard faithful set up sleeping bags and camp stoves in front of Apple retail stores in advance of Friday's opening sales day, it may be the time -- or at least the opportunity -- to ask a question: Does anybody really need an iPhone 5?
JIM ALGAR, United Press Internation
Tablet wars heat up

Tablet wars heat up

When Amazon.com unveiled its new family of more powerful tablet computers last week, they painted a large bulls-eye on Apple, its all-powerful iPad and its nearly 60 percent hold on the tablet computer market.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
Tablets: Does size matter?

Tablets: Does size matter?

As tablet computers proliferate and look more and more alike, Apple and Samsung have thrown down the legal gauntlet.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
Are PCs desktop dinosaurs?

Are PCs desktop dinosaurs?

Read a good review of a desktop PC system lately? In fact, read anything at all about a desktop PC system lately? Probably not.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
You and your smartphone bill

You and your smartphone bill

The average cellphone these days is a device for texting, tweeting, browsing the Internet and -- just occasionally -- making a phone call, a considerable change from the early days of the devices that's reflected in the way cellphone carriers are making their money.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
1908. Target: Earth

1908. Target: Earth

When astronomers consider cosmic collisions having impacts on the Earth, their eyes turn either to events of the distant past -- like the asteroid impact 65 million years ago that may have pushed the dinosaurs to extinction -- or to the uncertain future, as telescopes and satellites search for so-called Near Earth Objects that might someday represent a collision threat to our planet.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
When the sun brought darkness

When the sun brought darkness

When a huge solar flare Thursday sent a magnetic storm heading toward Earth, Americans heard the usual warnings of possible power outages, disruption of satellite communications and other effects -- and for the most part ignored them.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
If it's the Higgs, now what?

If it's the Higgs, now what?

With the July 4th announcement of the possible -- wait, make that probable -- no, actually, make that the almost certain confirmation of the existence of the Higgs boson, the so-called "God particle," physicists find themselves facing a fundamental question.
JIM ALGAR, United Press International
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