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Google unveils the prototype for their first self-driving car

The prototype is a more complete version of what they unveiled in May.
By Thor Benson Contact the Author   |   Dec. 22, 2014 at 6:49 PM
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., Dec. 22 (UPI) -- Google unveiled the prototype for their first self-driving car on Monday.

The company had revealed a similar prototype in May, but it didn't have all the parts necessary to take it on the road, including headlights. The company said the new version is ready for the road and will be tested over the holidays, and it may be on public streets in Northern California next year.

Test drivers will be behind the wheel during early tests, as to have the option of taking control of the vehicle manually if necessary.

The driverless vehicle's Lidar system on the roof appears to be much smaller than it was in May, which is the device that holds the sensors for detecting its surroundings.

© 2014 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.

Couple fight to keep $160,000 wine collection

By Aileen Graef Follow @AileenGraef Contact the Author   |   Dec. 22, 2014 at 4:31 PM
PHILADELPHIA, Dec. 22 (UPI) -- Wine collector Arthur Goldman and his wife are trying to stop the state of Pennsylvania from seizing and destroying their $160,000 collection of wine.

Goldman and his wife first began buying wine online and collecting it, even gaining access to limited supplies in California, when they had their primary residence in New Jersey. Goldman shared his love of wine, letting his friends even pool their money to place orders for the special vintages.

The Goldmans started having trouble once they bought a house in Pennsylvania, and some time later, moved their primary residence -- and wine collection -- with them. However, the initial anonymous accusation that Goldman was selling wine without a license came while his primary residence was still in New Jersey, Reason.com reported.

Under Pennsylvania law, online wine purchases are legal but they must be sent to a wine and spirits store in the state -- this way Pennsylvania can place tax on the liquor.

After an undercover investigation, Goldman was charged with being a wine dealer and his bottles were taken by Pennsylvania police.

Goldman entered a first offender program and will eventually have his record expunged but the police are still trying to destroy the collection of 2,447 bottles of wine valued at $160,000.

"Art and Melissa deserve the return of their wine," said Peter Kratsa, attorney for Goldman. "We believe the facts of the case and the law as applied to the facts of the case will vindicate the position that they have their wine returned."

© 2014 United Press International, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Any reproduction, republication, redistribution and/or modification of any UPI content is expressly prohibited without UPI's prior written consent.
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