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Engility to train African peacekeepers

Soldiers from African countries participating in U.N. peacekeeping operations in the country of Mali are to receive training from Engility Holding Inc. under a contract from the U.S. State Department.
By Richard Tomkins   |   Aug. 5, 2014 at 2:16 PM   |   Comments

CHANTILLY, Va., Aug. 5 (UPI) -- Troops from African countries participating in peacekeeping operations in Mali are to receive training from Engility Holdings Inc. of the United States.

The 12-week, intensive training course for soldiers and battalion commanders from Benin, Senegal and Niger will be conducted under the Africa Contingency Operations Training and Assistance -- or ACOTA -- program operated by the U.S. Department of State, Africa Bureau.

The contract for the training is worth $10.2 million. It has a base period of performance of one year and a one-year option.

"We are extremely pleased to win this contract and very much appreciate the confidence our Department of State customers have placed in us," said Engility President and Chief Executive Officer Tony Smeraglinolo.

"This award reflects our company's commitment to Africa and is a tribute to the outstanding work of our professionals who are supporting the UN mission to train and equip the militaries of African nations taking part in the peacekeeping program in Mali."

Engility said as part of the contract it will ship and provide the units with non-lethal military equipment, such as helmets, vests and uniforms.

Mali is located in upper West Africa and has been battling Islamist rebels.

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