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More submarine work for General Dynamics

Jan. 17, 2014 at 12:26 PM

FAIRFAX, Va., Jan. 17 (UPI) -- The U.S. Navy has given General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems two contracts to continue modernization of U.S. and British Royal Navy submarine fleets.

The contracts issued by the Navy's Strategic Systems Programs office, which include repair, maintenance, training and support equipment, carry a combined value of $227 million.

The performance periods of the contracts for integrating new technologies on ballistic missile submarines were not disclosed.

"These contracts are a testament to our 50-year legacy of delivering high-quality mission-critical solutions to the U.S. Navy," said Mike Eagan, vice president and general manager of Critical Mission Systems for General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems. "By capitalizing on our in-depth experience, existing resources and open architecture framework, we are helping the Navy reduce risk for future payloads and maximize commonality between the SSBN, SSGN and SSBN-R weapons control systems."

In other company news, General Dynamics said its Electric Boat subsidiary has received a $15 million contract modification from the U.S. Navy to perform non-nuclear maintenance work for submarines homeported at the Naval Submarine Base in Groton, Conn.

Under the modification, Electric Boat will continue operating the New England Maintenance Manpower Initiative at the base, providing a range of overhaul, repair and modernization services in support of nuclear submarines, floating dry-docks, support and service craft.

The original contract was awarded in 2012 and has a potential value of $222.3 million over five years.

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