Bell Boeing submits new Osprey proposal

Aug. 5, 2011 at 3:53 PM

PATUXENT RIVER, Md., Aug. 5 (UPI) -- The Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey program has submitted a proposal to the U.S. government for a second multiyear contract to produce the aircraft.

Work on the V-22 under the first award, which runs to fiscal year 2012, is on-time and under budget the company said.

Under that contract, 174 aircraft, including 143 MV-22 variants for the U.S. Marine Corps and 31 CV-22s for Air Force Special Operations Command were being produced.

The MYP II proposal includes 122 aircraft over fiscal years 2013-17, continuing deliveries through 2019.

Ten Marine and five AFSOC V-22 squadrons are operational and the two services have together logged 16 successful combat, humanitarian, ship-based and special operations deployments since 2007.

The V-22 Osprey is a joint service, multi-role combat aircraft using tiltrotor technology to combine the vertical performance of a helicopter with the speed and range of a fixed-wing aircraft.

With its nacelles and rotors in vertical position, it can take off, land and hover like a helicopter. Once airborne, its nacelles can be rotated to transition the aircraft to a turboprop airplane capable of high-speed, high-altitude flight.

"Bell Boeing is very pleased to respond to the Navy's request for proposal for a second multi-year contract for V-22 Osprey production," said John Rader, executive director, Bell Boeing V-22 Program.

"In an era that demands greater fiscal responsibility, the MYP II contract would enable us to most-efficiently deliver this revolutionary capability to our customers while generating further savings for the American taxpayer and bringing strength and stability to the industrial base."

Related UPI Stories
Latest Headlines
Trending News
U.S. Air Force expands drone training at Holloman
Royal Navy begins work on third offshore patrol vessel
U.S. State Dept. approves sale of MQ-9 Reapers to Spain
U.S. Navy orders new robots, servicing
Netherlands orders Sniper targeting pods for F-16s