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Debate stirs over future of British wind

July 23, 2012 at 8:49 AM   |   Comments

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LONDON, July 23 (UPI) -- Draft legislation under review in London could make onshore wind more expensive, undermining green energy objectives, an official said.

Tim Yeo, chairman of an energy and climate change committee in the British Parliament, told the BBC that proposed cuts to onshore wind energy programs would translate to higher consumer bills.

"This is really counterproductive," he said. "How can investors be confident in planning long-term projects which will rely on price support if the government might turn round and say 'Sorry, the cash has run out.'"

The United Kingdom is the world leader in offshore wind capacity. The country aims to generate 15 percent of its overall energy from renewable resources by 2020.

Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond sent a letter to British Secretary of State for Energy and Climate change Ed Davey expressing his support for onshore wind.

Salmond said continued support was needed in order to meet long-term binding targets for renewable energy.

"Across Europe and around the world, governments, citizens and industry are working to develop a low carbon economy, including big increases in clean energy generation -- protecting the environment and creating jobs in the process," his letter read.

Topics: Alex Salmond
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